Wikipedia – Burzynski Clinic – Antineoplastons – Fact checked & Corrected

Burzynski Clinic Wikipedia (Fact checked & corrected – work in progress)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, and then fact checked and fixed, since a powerful Astroturf campaign has high-jacked the original Wikipedia post, and locked it.
Page semi-protected
(This web entry is a work in progress, and will be updated over the coming weeks with a full source list of all inaccuracies and fabrications by the vicious corporate Astroturf campaign against this new life-saving technology. Once completed, this post will have all sources verified by the US Government’s own documentation and peer-reviewed literature. Subscribe to this blog to stay informed).

The Burzynski Clinic is a clinic in TexasUnited States founded in 1976 and offering unproven cancer treatment.

*TRUE.

The clinic is best known for the controversy surrounding its “antineoplaston therapy”, a chemotherapy using compounds it calls antineoplastons, devised by the clinic’s founder Stanislaw Burzynski in the 1970s.

*SOMEWHAT TRUE. The Astroturf campaign that owns the “official” Wikipedia entry chooses to tell a half-truth here, by calling it “chemotherapy”. Antineoplastons (ANP) are a manufactured chemical,  thus by definition being a “chemical-therapy” or “chemotherapy”, however, Antineoplastons are derived from naturally occurring peptides, and have near zero toxic side effects (no vomiting, no hair falling out, and no additional cancers are proven to emerge from ANP use in FDA-sanctioned clinical trials).

The clinic has been the focus of much criticism due to the way its unproven antineoplaston therapy is promoted, the costs for cancer sufferers participating in “trials” of antineoplastons, significant problems with the way these trials are run, legal cases brought as a result of the sale of the therapy without board approval, and for other causes.

*FALSE – THE BEST LIES ARE FORMED FROM HALF-TRUTHS: The clinic has been the focus of much criticism, due to the fact that ANP is curing types of terminal cancer never before cured in medical history – but not due to the reasons mentioned here. Many legal cases have been brought against Burzynski, but not one single legal case has resulted in any conviction. One of the most powerful tools in fighting a scientific innovation like ANP is filing trumped-up charges against the inventor, in order to try to distract his focus and cost him thousands of dollars. You will also notice the Wiki author places quotes around “trials” – as if to infer that the clinical trials do not exist. They directly contradict themselves later in the article.

There is a scientific consensus that antineoplaston therapy is unproven and of little promise in treating cancer.

*FALSE.

Clinical trials initiated in 1993 and sponsored by the National Cancer Institute were closed due to inability to recruit qualifying patients, and a Mayo Clinic study found no benefit from antineoplaston treatment.[1] Some sixty phase 2 clinical trials and one Phase 3 trial have been registered by Burzynski since the mid-1990s, but no results have been published.

*FALSE.

The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center has stated: “Bottom Line: There is no clear evidence to support the anticancer effects of antineoplastons in humans.”[1]

*FALSE. This statement related to Sloan-Kettering was literally invented out of thin air. If you visit the source they list you will find that they mention nothing of the sort, but instead the source links to Sloan-Kettering’s home page. Classic example of fabricated propaganda by the Astroturf campaign to manipulate the public.

Stanislaw Burzynski

Stanislaw Rajmund Burzynski is founder, president and chairman of the controversial Burzynski Research Institute Inc. (OTCQBBZYR), based in Houston and Stafford, Texas.

*TRUE.

He was born on January 23, 1943 in LublinPoland. On graduating at age 24, from the Medical Academy in Lublin, he had published fourteen papers.[2][3] The following year he earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry.[4]

*TRUE.

Burzynski immigrated to the United States in 1970 working at Baylor College until 1977, when he established the Burzynski Research Laboratory, where he administered antineoplaston therapy, initially to 21 patients then more widely as “experimental” treatment,

*TRUE.

immediately opening himself up to “charges of unethical conduct and to the suspicion he had become a merchant of false hope”.[5]

*FALSE. This is injected opinion, not based on any factual reality. As mentioned earlier, many charges were placed against Burzynski, but not one single charge ever resulted in a conviction. Burzynski defeated the State Government in their own Supremem Court, and defeated the Federal Government twice in 2 jury trials.

Having effectively exiled himself from mainstream medicine, Burzynski pursued a course of promoting his offerings using publicity, and “aggressively [seeking] out … terminally ill cancer patients”, leading to several instances of media controversy.[5]

*FALSE. This is injected opinion, not based on any factual reality.

Burzynski founded the Burzynski Research Institute in 1984.[6] He has authored various research publications on antineoplastons[7] and holds American patents on the treatments.[8]

*TRUE. Though the conveniently omit that many of the research publications are peer-reviewed.

In 2013, Burzynski was awarded the James Randi Educational Foundation‘s Pigasus Award, which is bestowed each April Fool’s Day on frauds.[9]

*TRUE. However, the James Randi Foundation is clandestine propaganda mouth piece for the Astroturf Campaign against Burzynski. It is founded by a former magician, who owns a non-profit, with a large proportion of his donated money coming from an “anonymous donor in Washington D.C.”. James Randi was accused of trying to solicit sex from a minor and was forced out of Canada, and his foundation resides in Australia, a safe distance fro the USA to continue the clandestine nature of it’s propaganda war against Burzynski and Antineoplastons.

Antineoplaston therapy

Antineoplaston is a name coined by Stanislaw Burzynski for a group of peptides, peptide derivatives, and mixtures that he uses as an alternative cancer treatment.The word is derived from neoplasm.

*TRUE. However, the term “alternative” is ambiguous as anything is an alternative to anything. You will find a lot of injected bigoted opinion throughout the “official” Wikipedia entry on Burzynski.

Antineoplaston therapy has been offered in the US since 1984 but is not approved for general use due to lack of clinical evidence. The compounds are not licensed as drugs but are instead sold and administered by as part of clinical trials at the Burzynski Clinic and the Burzynski Research Institute.

*FALSE: Antineoplastons have been offered in the USA since 1977.
*FALSE: They are not approved for public use because the FDA hasn’t approved them for public use. There was been an overwhelming amount of evidence proving the efficacy, so much so that the FDA has granted Phase III randomized trials for Antineoplastons. Antineoplastons have not only shown efficacy, but they are the first substances in the history of medicine to cure a childhood brainstem glioma—ever. If that doesn’t prove efficacy, than nothing else can.

(This web entry is a work in progress, and will be updated over the coming weeks with a full source list of all inaccuracies and fabrications by the vicious corporate Astroturf campaign against this new life-saving technology. Once completed, this post will have all sources verified by the US Government’s own documentation and peer-reviewed literature. Subscribe to this blog to stay informed).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: